Monthly Archives: February 2016

The WET – Yet?

Kununurra felt like a steamy soup when we arrived back  in mid January. Continuous days of heat and building humidity. We lived with the hope that this was the  ‘Wet Season’  – a weather pattern  which would deliver storms and rain every day bringing  relief from the constant temperatures. In late November and December we experienced  a couple of spectacular storms which had me asking the locals ‘Is this the Wet yet’? This is the annual question  when the build-up becomes unbearable and everyone seek reassurance that the first sprinkle heralds the beginning of The Wet.  Storms are a big event in the Kimberley – they commence with a build in pressure as the cumulus clouds pile ever higher and darken to pitch. Its all drama in Act 1. when lightening begins to flash and  thunder rolls and rumbles. In Act 2, enter the wind followed by the first heavy drops of rain.  All is resolved in Act 3 when the rain buckets and the temperature drops bringing great relief to the overheated audience.

Storm from Kelly's Knob
Storm from Kelly’s Knob
Fire and water from Kelly's knob
Fire and water from Kelly’s knob

The locals say that this is not a normal wet season ( I suppose that locals everywhere are saying this about the climate). We are often being teased by the build to a storm which passes, leaving just a sniff of rain and no decrease in temperature. And yet the countryside is verdant and the vibrant red ochre of the mountains and plateaus in the dry season has been hidden under a carpet of green.

Storm watcher
Storm watcher
Drama of the approaching storm
Drama of the approaching storm

When we do have rain,  the creeks and rivers rapidly fill and water again falls over escarpments. Too much rain,  and the dirt roads turn to mud and all this beauty the wet sows becomes inaccessible (to us).

Middle Springs after a little rain
Middle Springs after a little rain
The pool at Middle Springs
In The Grotto
In The Grotto

The hash beauty that we experienced in the dry season softens; frogs and lizards are in abundance  and the distinctive boab, the symbol of the Kimberley, is lost under a wig of leaves and fruit.

Boabs undercover at Black Rock Springs
Boabs undercover at Black Rock Springs

 

Boab in fruit
Boab in fruit

And yet the abundance of nature in The Wet is not reflected with what we can purchase in the supermarket. In fact,  the roads can become impassable and the shelves become empty …..no fresh food.Even the meat, dairy and bakery were depleted  after the cyclone on the Pilbara Coast last week.

The last chop
The last chop

Long may it Rain!!